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Medication Errors at a Tenet Healthcare Hospital Result in Premature Birth, Accidental Abortion

October 1st, 2009
Last month, a lawsuit was filed by a victim of medication error, which caused premature birth of her daughter and resulted in severe brain damage to the baby. Tesome Sampson was one of two victims of prescription error on one tragic day in August 2008, at a Florida hospital operated by Tenet Healthcare Corporation. Sampson was ordered by her doctor to strict bed rest at the hospital, when she was five-and-a-half months pregnant according to Avni Patel of ABC News. Sampson’s doctor prescribed her Progesterone Suppositories to prevent premature labor, however the hospital staff mistakenly gave her a dose of Prostin instead; Prostin is a drug used to induce labor after a miscarriage. After immediately complaining of extreme abdominal pain, hospital staff suggested Sampson merely “needed to have a bowel movement”. The result of the staff’ mistake was the premature birth of Sampson’s now eleven-month old daughter into a commode.
To compound the hospital staff’s mistake and make the error even more tragic, the oversight came just hours after a similar medication error caused another patient, ordered by her doctor to strict bed rest at the same hospital, to abort her unborn twins. In a statement released by the hospital, the incidents were described as “an unfortunate error that occurred despite the safeguards we have in place.” Sampson’s lawsuit alleges the incident which occurred hours before, referring to the unborn twins who were accidentally aborted, should have made the hospital staff more cautious in administering the medication. According to Businesweek, the suit seeks unspecified damages; medical bills for Sampson’s brain-damaged baby currently exceed $3.5 million.
Michael Cohen of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices, a Pennsylvania non-profit organization for the prevention of medication error, says there are many things which can go wrong in the administration of medication due to countless procedures, processes, and changes in hospital personnel. Cohen claims only ten to twelve percent of hospitals have computerized systems which may be utilized by doctors; prescriptions hand-written by doctors can be misread by pharmacists or other hospital staff and is often a cause of medication error. A 2006 survey by administered by the National Academies’ Institute of Medicine estimates 400,000 preventable drug-related injuries occur every year.
Even the most minor of medical or pharmaceutical error can lead to grave consequences to a patient and their loved-ones. The administration of pharmaceuticals is a significant responsibility which must be undertaken with the utmost of care for the patient.
Nevertheless, accidents which are easily preventable occur all too often. The lawyers of Pharmacy-Mistake.com are experienced in the successful representation of victims of medical and pharmaceutical error. If you, or someone you know, have been injured because of taking the wrong medicine, or because of some other mistake, please contact us at Pharmacy-Mistake.com for a free consultation. Our attorneys are available to assist in all aspects of your recovery.

Last month, a lawsuit was filed by a victim of medication error that caused premature birth of her daughter and resulted in severe brain damage to the baby.

Tesome Sampson was one of two victims of prescription error on one tragic day in August 2008, at a Florida hospital operated by Tenet Healthcare Corporation. Sampson was ordered by her doctor to strict bed rest at the hospital, when she was five-and-a-half months pregnant according to Avni Patel of ABC News. Sampson’s doctor prescribed her Progesterone Suppositories to prevent premature labor, however the hospital staff mistakenly gave her a dose of Prostin instead; Prostin is a drug used to induce labor after a miscarriage. After immediately complaining of extreme abdominal pain, hospital staff suggested Sampson merely “needed to have a bowel movement”. The result of the staff’ mistake was the premature birth of Sampson’s now eleven-month old daughter into a commode.

To compound the hospital staff’s mistake and make the error even more tragic, the oversight came just hours after a similar medication error caused another patient, ordered by her doctor to strict bed rest at the same hospital, to abort her unborn twins. In a statement released by the hospital, the incidents were described as “an unfortunate error that occurred despite the safeguards we have in place.” Sampson’s lawsuit alleges the incident which occurred hours before, referring to the unborn twins who were accidentally aborted, should have made the hospital staff more cautious in administering the medication. According to Businesweek, the suit seeks unspecified damages; medical bills for Sampson’s brain-damaged baby currently exceed $3.5 million.

Michael Cohen of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices, a Pennsylvania non-profit organization for the prevention of medication error, says there are many things which can go wrong in the administration of medication due to countless procedures, processes, and changes in hospital personnel. Cohen claims only ten to twelve percent of hospitals have computerized systems which may be utilized by doctors; prescriptions hand-written by doctors can be misread by pharmacists or other hospital staff and is often a cause of medication error. A 2006 survey by administered by the National Academies’ Institute of Medicine estimates 400,000 preventable drug-related injuries occur every year.

Even the most minor of medical or pharmaceutical error can lead to grave consequences to a patient and their loved-ones. The administration of pharmaceuticals is a significant responsibility which must be undertaken with the utmost of care for the patient.

Nevertheless, accidents which are easily preventable occur all too often. The lawyers of Pharmacy-Mistake.com are experienced in the successful representation of victims of medical and pharmaceutical error. If you, or someone you know, have been injured because of taking the wrong medicine, or because of some other mistake, please contact us at Pharmacy-Mistake.com for a free consultation. Our attorneys are available to assist in all aspects of your recovery.

 
     
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Gavin P. Lentz, Esq.
Bochetto & Lentz

Gavin Lentz (right) was selected as a "Super Lawyer" for 2006-2009 and 2010-2015 in New Jersey by Philadelphia Magazine. He has also been selected as a "Super Lawyer" by Philadelphia Magazine and the Legal Intelligencer in 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011 - 2015.

On September 16, 2002 Mr. Lentz was selected as one of the top 50 lawyers in Pennsylvania by the Legal Intelligencer.

He has made many television appearances, including on Fox News, The Today Show, Inside Edition, and The Phil Donahue Show.

Mr. Lentz is a member of the American Trial Lawyers Association and the Million Dollar Advocates Forum.

As a former prosecutor, he knows how to aggressively go after large pharmacy chains to prove the facts necessary to protect your loved one's rights.

 
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